The Value of Expertise

A corporation was refitting a building for a new production facility, and they needed to know where to drill a hole in the floor to install something and avoid damaging existing piping and wiring. They called a local engineer who came out, spent about twenty minutes making some measurements, marked the spot where the hole should be drilled, packed up his things, and left the premises. A short time later, the engineer sent an invoice for his services to the corporate accounts payable department: the invoice was for $1,000.  The CEO, in order to contain construction costs on this production facility, had instituted a policy that any invoices over a certain dollar amount were to be sent directly to him for his approval.  The engineer’s invoice was over that threshold.

Upon receipt of the engineer’s invoice, the CEO was livid.  He had been out at the production facility the day the engineer performed his services, and he remembered that the engineer didn’t spend that much time on his task.  So, the CEO took the invoice and wrote a note that read, “You spent twenty minutes at my facility, and all you did was mark an ‘X’ on our floor.  I’m not paying you $1,000 for twenty minutes of work.” Pleased with himself, he instructed the invoice be mailed back to the engineer posthaste (that’s what CEOs say when they want something done quickly, right).

A few days later, the CEO found an envelope sitting in his inbox that was addressed directly to him.  He opened the envelope and found the invoice from the engineer with a hand-written note scribbled at the bottom that read, “I’ve spent over twenty YEARS in my specialty to know EXACTLY where to mark that ‘X’ on your floor.  Kindly remit $1,000.”  Knowing the engineer was right, the CEO immediately approved the invoice and sent it on to accounts payable.

With the internet and especially YouTube, we’ve become a DIY people who like to fix things ourselves, and that’s admirable. However, there are still certain things we reserve for the experts in particular fields to do for us – I haven’t heard of someone with an eighth-grade education trying to perform an appendectomy on himself by watching a video, but I could be wrong (but I REALLY hope I’m not).

One of the fields in which I would highly recommend you get the RIGHT expert is credit repair for a mortgage.  I would NOT recommend a credit repair service; this isn’t because they are shady or underhanded – the vast majority are completely above board – but because they aren’t designed to get you where you need to be.  Their business model is simple: a person in need of help pays an up-front fee for some counseling and advice – all legitimate.  Whether the person they’re helping follows their advice or not, they’ve been paid: the service’s goal has been met.  When people need to repair their credit to qualify for a mortgage, the RIGHT expert to help them is us, the mortgage company.

We don’t charge a fee (no mortgage company should), and we give the borrower more attention and better advice than any other service or agency.  The reason is simple: we have a vested interest to help them repair their credit as quickly as possible so they can qualify for that mortgage – and that’s how we get paid.  At the end of it all, the client gets repaired credit and a home, and the real estate agent gets buyers who are ready to buy at that moment.  It doesn’t take an expert to see the wisdom in that, right?

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